Arguing for Economics as Education’s Priority

Napoleon said that an “army travels on its stomach.”

I take that to mean that any group or organization needs the capacity to sustain itself in order to continue itself.

So too must we consider a society, a society whose very existence can no longer be considered self sufficient, if it ever was, UNdependent of the globe’s other societies’ well being. Like it or not we live in what Friedman called a “flattened world”.¬†http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Thomas_Friedman_2005_(4).jpg

So, a good case for Napoleon’s point of view some two hundred years old certainly has merit!

Add in a twenty year old slogan of one James Carville, http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics/people/c/james_carville/index.html President Clinton’s campaign manager who said, “It’s the economy stupid.”

Nonetheless, we’d all like to think, that our own society, arguably the world’s most influential, needs to ground its policies and plans into thoughtful, long-term actions, that will enable it to thrive and to positively influence its fellow global citizens.

The thriving to which I refer actually speaks to many leadership challenges. These include but are not limited to

– being exemplary environmental global citizens

– being proactively sensitive to the needs of all people and groups

– maximizing the positive potential of all manners of technological advances

Now let’s return to the poll two posts back and to the “results” posted. I’d personally argue for the premise of process as I have said many times across many posts. That is, the more nearly American Education focus its curricular and instructional efforts on creating a nation of critical thinkers, effective decision makers, and creative problem solvers the better served we all are.

These would be citizens who can contribute to a lasting and successful economy, one that would be able to effectively maximize production, consumption, and wealth for the collective and individual good.

My “decision” doesn’t EXclude the other choices. Rather, it umbrellas them.

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